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A Senate of the States Part I: May 25th May 31st, 1787
Article V Blog ^ | October 9th 2017 | Rodney Dodsworth

Posted on 10/09/2017 1:36:24 AM PDT by Jacquerie

In this series I will relate the debates at the Federal Convention surrounding the structure and responsibilities of the US Senate. We’ll find that the Framers assigned the new government its functions, beyond those of the Confederation Congress, after the convention determined the mode of senatorial elections and the number of senators per state. Like pieces in a jigsaw puzzle, the structure and powers of the various pieces of government shaped, and were shaped by, the checks and balances between the three branches and the states. The shape of each piece influenced the shape of adjacent pieces. The pulling of one piece, or the re-shaping of one without adjusting the shape of others destroys the continuity, the fabric of the of the entire puzzle. A popularly elected senate doesn’t ‘fit in’ among adjacent pieces of a work designed around state-appointed senators. Through the vehicle of the Framers’ debates, I hope to convince more Article V opponents why the 17th Amendment must go.

On May 25th, delegates unanimously elected George Washington as president of the convention. He hoped his inexperience in such matters would do no harm, and he asked for the “indulgence of the House towards the involuntary errors which his inexperience might occasion.”

The Secretary read the delegates’ credentials aloud. Delaware was the only state that James Madison singled out in his notes. Their commissions prevented them from changing the Article in the Confederation which established equality of votes among the states. This issue, of proportional representation v. equality of state suffrage in the senate, lingered on into July.

May 28th. In a private note to himself, Madison related the large v. small state divide and the large states disgust with the conduct of some small states under the Articles of Confederation.

(Excerpt) Read more at articlevblog.com ...


TOPICS: Government; History; Politics
KEYWORDS: 17thamendment; articlev; cos; senate

1 posted on 10/09/2017 1:36:24 AM PDT by Jacquerie
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To: Jacquerie
The reason why the states went with popular vote for Senators? Because people were paying way too much attention to statehouse members and the Senators they voted in! The rule of thumb for any legislature is to evade responsibility in order to stay in office. That's why such bodies are happy to pass their powers to somebody else, it helps them hold their comfy seat longer.

The ploy worked. For me, until the Convention of States movement came along, I cared little who my state rep was. They have little say now in how we are actually governed. Power in the District of Corruption is nearly total.

2 posted on 10/09/2017 2:01:45 AM PDT by Nateman (If liberals are not screaming you are doing it wrong!)
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To: Nateman

The convention considered election by the House of Reps, by the people, and by the state legislatures. Suggested terms ran the gamut from three years to life. Fascinating stuff.

Yes, people would pay more attention to state elections if state legislators were once again responsible for appointing senators. I believe repeal of the 17A would enhance, somewhat, the quality of state legislators.


3 posted on 10/09/2017 2:50:40 AM PDT by Jacquerie (ArticleVBlog.com)
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To: Jacquerie

Bump


4 posted on 10/09/2017 3:20:39 AM PDT by foreverfree
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