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To Limit Gerrymandering, Supreme Court Needs Just to Reaffirm Equal Population Requirement
Townhall.com ^ | September 29, 2017 | Michael Barone

Posted on 09/29/2017 5:19:10 AM PDT by Kaslin

Next week, the Supreme Court will hear oral argument in Gill v. Whitford, a case challenging Wisconsin's legislative district lines as an unconstitutional Republican gerrymander. It's attracted attention because many high-minded commentators have blamed partisan gerrymandering for today's highly polarized politics -- and for the fact that Republicans have won majorities in 67 of the 98 houses of state legislatures and in 10 of the past 12 elections in the U.S. House of Representatives.

But as I and others have argued, gerrymandering has contributed only marginally to Republican success. More important is demographic clustering. Democratic voters are heavily clustered in central cities, sympathetic suburbs, and university towns, while Republican voters are more evenly spread around.

The Wisconsin Democrats want to require districting plans to compensate for this clustering, presumably by drawing long tentacles that stretch from central cities through suburbs and to the countryside. That strategy, followed by Democratic redistricters in Maryland and Illinois, has produced the nation's most grotesquely shaped congressional districts.

In Gill v. Whitford, Democrats found a favorable three-judge district court, but a five-vote majority of the Supreme Court blocked the ruling from taking effect while the court considers the case.

Unchallenged in this case is the requirement that districts have equal population, which the Supreme Court mandated in Reynolds v. Sims in 1964. Actually, the roots of the equal population requirement go back much further, to July 1787, when members of the Constitutional Convention agreed on clauses requiring that a federal census be conducted every ten years and that each state's number of representatives in the House be determined by the results of that census.

This was novel, perhaps entirely original. Seats in the British Parliament and in Continental counterparts were never allocated in this way. The Framers were endorsing the principle that representation should be directly related to population. The temporary apportionment they specified for pre-census Congresses was based on their informed estimates of states' populations.

The Framers did not specify just how members should be chosen within a state. In the early republic, as political scientist Jay K. Dow documents in his new book, "Electing the House," different states chose differently. Some chose members statewide; some used single- and multiple-member districts.

In 1842, Congress passed a statute requiring states to create districts with equal populations. Later Congresses added that districts should be compact and contiguous. These laws were not rigorously enforced through litigation but remained in effect until 1929, when they were dropped as part of a political compromise.

Urban interests were unhappy that Congress did not reapportion House seats among the states after the 1920 census as the Constitution requires. Rural members had refused because of the alleged pernicious tendencies of big cities.

The city folk got a provision, still in effect, setting an arithmetic formula that automatically reapportions House seats among the states from census results. Rural folk in return eliminated the equal population requirement so that rural-dominated legislatures in big states could create low-population rural districts that would elect Republicans and conservative Democrats.

That's what happened -- when legislatures bothered to redraw the lines at all. So by the 1960s, Michigan had one (Democratic) district with 802,000 people and one (Republican) district with 177,000. The Supreme Court in response reimposed the equal population standard that had been favored by the Framers and by Congresses for many decades.

Now come Wisconsin Democrats, essentially claiming that's unfair. They have concocted an "efficiency index," showing that the state's district lines leave many more Democratic than Republican voters with legislators they oppose. Of course, that's a consequence of clustering. Hillary Clinton lost Wisconsin by only one percentage point, but the counties she carried cast only 35 percent of the votes.

The Wisconsin plaintiffs are, in effect, insisting that the Constitution requires proportional representation, a system widely used in foreign countries but not required by the Framers or by past Congresses. Instead, Congress has required single-member districts, which tend to disadvantage parties with demographically clustered constituencies.

There are obvious practical problems with the plaintiffs' doctrine. It would require grotesquely shaped districts and arguably conflict with the Voting Rights Act. It would require redistricters to anticipate voters' often changing choices over ten years. Republican redistricting advantages didn't prevent Democrats from winning House majorities in 2006 and 2008 and might not in the next two elections.

By reimposing the equal population requirement, the high court has already provided an effective limit to partisan benefit from redistricting. The Framers pointed us in that direction, not toward entrusting (sometimes partisan) judges with the impossible task of eliminating partisanship from politics.


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Editorial; Government; US: Wisconsin
KEYWORDS: demonrats; gerrymandering; gillvswhitford; gillvwhitford; republican; supremecourt
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1 posted on 09/29/2017 5:19:10 AM PDT by Kaslin
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To: Kaslin

More sniveling and whining from the left who can’t win in the arena of ideas.


2 posted on 09/29/2017 5:26:16 AM PDT by GT Vander (Life's priorities; God, Family, Country. Everything else is just details...)
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To: GT Vander

Doesnt the left need gerrymandering for some of their own districts?


3 posted on 09/29/2017 5:30:35 AM PDT by Morpheus2009
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To: Morpheus2009

They must, how else do you explain Rep. Al Green and Sheila Jackson Lee?


4 posted on 09/29/2017 5:33:04 AM PDT by GT Vander (Life's priorities; God, Family, Country. Everything else is just details...)
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To: Kaslin

A big red herring. Districts have always been apportioned by population.


5 posted on 09/29/2017 5:33:21 AM PDT by captain_dave
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To: Kaslin

Slightly off topic, but does anyone remember that years ago, blacks were complaining that house districts were too “equal”, meaning they (minorities) didn’t have enough numbers in any one district to elect minority representatives?

So some districts were created to pack them with minorities and the expected result came to pass. But this process also left quite a few “majority-majority” districts that went more Republican than they otherwise would have.

Now there are complaints about that from some quarters. You just can’t please some people, it seems.


6 posted on 09/29/2017 5:33:36 AM PDT by SnuffaBolshevik
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To: GT Vander

I was thinking of Crazy Maxine, but those are good examples as well.


7 posted on 09/29/2017 5:34:46 AM PDT by Morpheus2009
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To: Kaslin
The Wisconsin Democrats want to require districting plans to compensate for this clustering, presumably by drawing long tentacles that stretch from central cities through suburbs and to the countryside. That strategy, followed by Democratic redistricters in Maryland and Illinois, has produced the nation's most grotesquely shaped congressional districts.

Of course, Democrats complain when this strategy is used, too. Texas already uses a form of this. Several Congressional districts are anchored in the densely populated Rio Grande Valley. These so-called "bacon strip districts" extend hundreds of miles north into the GOP countryside in order to get sufficient population. The reason the GOP-dominated legislature created these districts was to create majority-minority (Hispanic) opportunity districts.

Democrats filed a lawsuit claiming the bacon strip districts were unconstitutional. I sincerely believe that to be a Democrat you must be perpetually upset about something.

8 posted on 09/29/2017 5:44:14 AM PDT by SSS Two
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The Wisconsin Democrats want to require districting plans to compensate for this clustering,
presumably by drawing long tentacles that stretch from central cities through suburbs and
to the countryside. That strategy, followed by Democratic redistricters in Maryland and
Illinois, has produced the nation's most grotesquely shaped congressional districts.

************

Texas has one of those drawn districts for Shelia Jackson-Lee


9 posted on 09/29/2017 5:45:08 AM PDT by deport
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To: Kaslin

The Dems are packed into cities like rats in a corn crib.


10 posted on 09/29/2017 5:46:23 AM PDT by Beagle8U (Wake up and smell the Covfef)
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To: Kaslin

I’m going to have to comment on this one:

Yes, during the 1960s, the Courts tightened up allowed variance in population. This resulted in carving up of counties and municipalities. Basically, we shifted out of compact districts and communities of interest, into gerrymandered districts.

Then, the Congress in the VRA put a racial twist to this. Because of disparities in voting rates, minorities could be clumped into grotesquely gerrymandered districts so they would constitute a large majority within those districts and gain representation.

So far, I’m affirming Michael Barone, which is a good thing because he is a walking encyclopedia of American politics.

Now I’m going to diverge: The Courts are drifting away from the VRA district and grotesque gerrymanders because voting rates of blacks and whites have converged.

In this case, state laws requiring compact districts and communities of interest (in practice, counties and municipalities) must be more heavily considered by state legislatures and amalgamating minorities by crossing communities of interest less considered, or at least not considered as a means of diminishing minority representation.

In the Alabama cases, there was some evidence that the state legislature concentrated minorities into districts in order to gain a partisan advantage. The evidence, in my opinion, was kind of weak, but we’re not talking about a criminal proceeding where you need proof beyond a reasonable doubt.

As for this Wisconsin case, I think the state will prevail. The Democrats are trying to float a whole new theory of “equal protection,” namely, that parties (not individuals) should have equal protection. I think this argument will be rejected by the Supreme Court.


11 posted on 09/29/2017 5:52:12 AM PDT by Redmen4ever (u)
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To: Kaslin
The Wisconsin Democrats want to require districting plans to compensate for this clustering, presumably by drawing long tentacles that stretch from central cities through suburbs and to the countryside. That strategy, followed by Democratic redistricters in Maryland and Illinois, has produced the nation's most grotesquely shaped congressional districts.

Not all the Democrats feel this way. The current congressmen who benefit from solid urban districts LIKE getting overwhelming majorities and easy re-election wins.
12 posted on 09/29/2017 5:55:30 AM PDT by Dr. Sivana (There is no salvation in politics.)
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To: Kaslin
They have concocted an "efficiency index," showing that the state's district lines leave many more Democratic than Republican voters with legislators they oppose.

Enshrining formulas based on parties is not countenanced in the U.S. Constitution.
13 posted on 09/29/2017 5:59:09 AM PDT by Dr. Sivana (There is no salvation in politics.)
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To: GT Vander

What is suffering and should be considered is not the race or grouping type of people living in a given area. It is their acesses to a minimum of representation for services or specific needs offered by a specifix government agency.


14 posted on 09/29/2017 6:13:31 AM PDT by mosesdapoet (Mosesdapoet aka L.J.Keslin)
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To: Kaslin

Montana is disadvantaged in the House with a single District containing ~ 1,000,000 peeps.


15 posted on 09/29/2017 6:19:04 AM PDT by Paladin2 (No spelchk nor wrong word auto substition on mobile dev. Please be intelligent and deal with it....)
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To: deport

There is a set of rings for districts around ChIraq.

One for the brilliant Mr. Goo-tee-air-is.


16 posted on 09/29/2017 6:23:23 AM PDT by Paladin2 (No spelchk nor wrong word auto substition on mobile dev. Please be intelligent and deal with it....)
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To: deport

There is a set of rings for districts around ChIraq.

One for the brilliant Mr. Goo-tee-air-is.


17 posted on 09/29/2017 6:23:38 AM PDT by Paladin2 (No spelchk nor wrong word auto substition on mobile dev. Please be intelligent and deal with it....)
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To: Kaslin

Only US citizens should be counted, no one else!


18 posted on 09/29/2017 6:45:12 AM PDT by PTBAA
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To: deport

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Illinois%27_congressional_districts#/media/File%3AIllinois_US_Congressional_District_4_(since_2013).tif


19 posted on 09/29/2017 7:05:36 AM PDT by Paladin2 (No spelchk nor wrong word auto substition on mobile dev. Please be intelligent and deal with it....)
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To: Kaslin
End majority minority districts as that is racial gerrymandering and unconstitutional and then watch the progressives s__t their pants.
20 posted on 09/29/2017 7:20:52 AM PDT by bonehead4freedom
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