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In his own words Billy Graham on Martin Luther King, Jr.
Billy Graham Library ^ | 2015 | Billy Graham

Posted on 01/12/2018 5:33:17 PM PST by GoldenState_Rose

Civil rights were very much in the forefront in America during the 1960s and early 1970s. As the issue unfolded, I sometimes found myself under fire from both sides, extreme conservatives castigating me for doing too much and extreme liberals blaming me for not doing enough. In reality, both groups tended to stand aloof from our evangelistic Crusades, but those people who actively supported us understood very well our commitment to doing what we could through our evangelism to end the blight of racism.

Early on, Dr. King and I spoke about his method of using non-violent demonstrations to bring an end to racial segregation. He urged me to keep doing what I was doing – preaching the Gospel to integrated audiences and supporting his goals by example – and not join him in the streets. “You stay in the stadiums, Billy,” he said, “because you will have far more impact on the white establishment there than you would if you marched in the streets. Besides that, you have a constituency that will listen to you, especially among the white people, who may not listen so much to me. But if a leader gets too far out in front of his people, they will lose sight of him and not follow him any longer.” I followed his advice.

(Excerpt) Read more at billygrahamlibrary.org ...


TOPICS: Ecumenism; General Discusssion; History; Religion & Culture
KEYWORDS: billygraham; christianity; civilrights; evangelism; graham; history; king; martinlutherking; martinlutherkingjr; mlk; mlkday; race; racism
VIDEO: "Taking Down the Ropes of Segregation"

https://billygraham.org/video/taking-down-the-ropes-of-segregation/?sharer=1

1 posted on 01/12/2018 5:33:17 PM PST by GoldenState_Rose
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To: GoldenState_Rose

2 posted on 01/12/2018 5:36:56 PM PST by mrmeyer (You can't conquer a free man; the most you can do is kill him. Robert Heinlein)
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To: GoldenState_Rose

I have no use for Billy Graham ever since he said that Hillary would make a great president, nor do I have any use for MLK. If he were alive today, I think he’d be trumpeting the same crap as Jessie Jackson and Sharpton.


3 posted on 01/12/2018 5:37:21 PM PST by laweeks
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To: Ciaphas Cain

*Ping*

Reverend Billy Graham received criticism from both conservatives and liberals for his Civil Rights advocacy. The movement was too complex and multi-faceted to put under a neat “Democrat” or “Republican” political umbrella.

But one thing we should be able to agree on at this point, as Christians and as Americans: that GOD was behind it, and He used all kinds of people to accomplish His ends. And that the full fruition of the movement will be realized in Heaven.

“...After this I looked, and behold, a great multitude that no one could number, from every nation, from all tribes and peoples and languages, standing before the throne and before the Lamb...” ~ Revelation 7:9


4 posted on 01/12/2018 5:38:51 PM PST by GoldenState_Rose
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To: GoldenState_Rose

He said and believed a lot of things I didn’t and don’t agree with but he was an American who did not believe in violence to achieve ends. Whatever your politics, that’s the American way.

He was a registered Republican. Most blacks were after the Civil War, although that began to change during the Roosevelt era.

He was not a conservative. Had he been, his movement would have gone farther, faster. Dixiecrats abhorred him.


5 posted on 01/12/2018 6:01:05 PM PST by Combat_Liberalism
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To: Combat_Liberalism

MLK, Jr. was not a registered Republican. That’s been debunked here many times (based on a poorly researched article from a decade ago). The sole claim was that he voted for Eisenhower once in 1956, but so did Democrat Congressman from NYC Adam Clayton Powell, Jr.


6 posted on 01/12/2018 6:04:01 PM PST by fieldmarshaldj ("It's Slappin' Time !")
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To: GoldenState_Rose

I admire, and have great respect for, Billy Graham.

And I also think highly of Dr King, even though he was far from perfect.

I’m so far from perfect that I find it pretty easy to cut others a lot of slack....I’m a modest man, I have a lot to be modest about...lol


7 posted on 01/12/2018 6:08:50 PM PST by Bobalu (12 diet Cokes and a fried chicken...)
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To: GoldenState_Rose

Very good post.


8 posted on 01/12/2018 6:11:52 PM PST by Jamestown1630 ("A Republic, if you can keep it.")
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To: Bobalu

I’m with you. Both Billy Graham and MLK made us a better people.


9 posted on 01/12/2018 6:36:50 PM PST by Helotes
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To: GoldenState_Rose
Let's face it, the best thing to ever happen to Martin Luther King Jr.--that old plagiarist, con-man and whoremonger--was to get shot. If he had been alive today, he'd be as odious and irrelevant as any black Democratic politician, which is to say, pretty odious and irrelevant!
10 posted on 01/12/2018 6:51:59 PM PST by Greetings_Puny_Humans (I mostly come out at night... mostly.)
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To: GoldenState_Rose
But one thing we should be able to agree on at this point, as Christians and as Americans: that GOD was behind it, and He used all kinds of people to accomplish His ends. And that the full fruition of the movement will be realized in Heaven.

If anything, the whole civil rights movement has been more of a curse on the entire nation. Not only are children brainwashed into a cult of civil rights worship, even literally singing praises to the rather sleazy and corrupt MLK, but "civil rights" history essentially dominates all of United States' history in the schools. No student these days learns much of anything else except that MLK is basically a God and white men are evil. Real history, real values, real movements with worthy values are all cast to the wayside.

All the blacks got out of it was the right to drink from non-colored water fountains and unlimited welfare, affirmative action, and all sorts of goodies that do them no good. They still segregate themselves and their mass violence, criminality and rape goes beyond any level it ever was before.

11 posted on 01/12/2018 6:58:33 PM PST by Greetings_Puny_Humans (I mostly come out at night... mostly.)
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To: GoldenState_Rose

I was watching a short bio on Martin Luther, the German reformer, and learned that M.L.K., Jr. changed his name from Michael King to Martin Luther King after studying Luther’s methods for non-violent reform.


12 posted on 01/12/2018 7:01:48 PM PST by boatbums (The Law is a storm which wrecks your hopes of self-salvation, but washes you upon the Rock of Ages.)
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To: Greetings_Puny_Humans

Some people accomplish very beneficial things in the world, even though they may be flawed human beings.


13 posted on 01/12/2018 7:27:25 PM PST by Jamestown1630 ("A Republic, if you can keep it.")
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To: Greetings_Puny_Humans

How do you think that things have might have gone differently?

It’s easy to criticize the people who tried to foster change; nobody is perfect. But there would have been NO change, unless someone - however imperfect - had been willing to step up to the plate, and TRY.

How do you suppose that things could have been done differently?


14 posted on 01/12/2018 7:32:33 PM PST by Jamestown1630 ("A Republic, if you can keep it.")
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To: boatbums

Then where did the “jr.” come from?


15 posted on 01/12/2018 7:56:22 PM PST by Zuriel (Acts 2:38,39....Do you believe it?)
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To: Zuriel

Martin Luther King Jr. (born Michael King Jr., January 15, 1929 – April 4, 1968).


16 posted on 01/13/2018 12:56:34 PM PST by boatbums (The Law is a storm which wrecks your hopes of self-salvation, but washes you upon the Rock of Ages.)
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